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Copper Mining Equipment





copper mining equipment






    mining equipment
  • Mining is the extraction of valuable minerals or other geological materials from the earth, usually from an ore body, vein or (coal) seam. Materials recovered by mining include base metals, precious metals, iron, uranium, coal, diamonds, limestone, oil shale, rock salt and potash.





    copper
  • A police officer

  • a ductile malleable reddish-brown corrosion-resistant diamagnetic metallic element; occurs in various minerals but is the only metal that occurs abundantly in large masses; used as an electrical and thermal conductor

  • coat with a layer of copper

  • a copper penny











copper mining equipment - Copper Exchange




Copper Exchange Capacity of Clays and Their Potential Effect on In Situ Copper Leaching


Copper Exchange Capacity of Clays and Their Potential Effect on In Situ Copper Leaching



he U.S. Bureau of Mines conducted Cu exchange tests for six common clays under simulated in situ leaching conditions. Regression equations were obtained from the data expressing the Cu exchange capacity as a function of Cu concentration, pH, and temperature. Using these equations, an analysis was made of the impact each clay could have on overall Cu recovery. The results suggest that Ca and Na montmorillonite clays could have a major impact on Cu recovery and that attapulgite and illite clays could have a smaller, but still significant, impact. Kaolinite and ripidolite clays pose little threat to loss of Cu from in situ leaching solutions.

he U.S. Bureau of Mines conducted Cu exchange tests for six common clays under simulated in situ leaching conditions. Regression equations were obtained from the data expressing the Cu exchange capacity as a function of Cu concentration, pH, and temperature. Using these equations, an analysis was made of the impact each clay could have on overall Cu recovery. The results suggest that Ca and Na montmorillonite clays could have a major impact on Cu recovery and that attapulgite and illite clays could have a smaller, but still significant, impact. Kaolinite and ripidolite clays pose little threat to loss of Cu from in situ leaching solutions.










87% (17)





1-14-11, (020) Static Mine Equipment Display




1-14-11, (020) Static Mine Equipment Display





Various pieces of outdated mine equipment are displayed adjacent to the Asarco Mission Copper Mine's Tour headquarters.











Robinson Tripp-Veteran Copper Mine




Robinson Tripp-Veteran Copper Mine





Cat 793, 240 ton haul trucks coming out of Robinson Nevada Mining Company's Tripp-Veteran Pit at Ely Nevada.









copper mining equipment








copper mining equipment




Ergonomic Assessment of Musculoskeletal Risk Factors at Four Mine Sites: Underground Coal, Surface Copper, Surface Phosphate, and Underground Limestone






This study examined musculoskeletal injury risk at four mining sites: underground coal, underground limestone, surface copper, and surface phosphate. Each site offered opportunities to investigate musculoskeletal disorder (MSD) injury risks and how those risks might be identified and categorized. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) worked with these sites to (1) identify work activities that showed evidence of MSD injury risk, (2) examine physical risk factors that can lead to MSDs for a handful of work tasks at each site, and (3) develop a set of ideas for problem-solving to help reduce risk factors for examined work tasks. For each site, NIOSH implemented a plan that was refined over the time period of this study. The plan consisted of four steps. The first step was to use mine injury records, a musculoskeletal discomfort questionnaire, front-line supervisor interviews, and a list of management concerns to identify work groups and work activities that have significant evidence of MSD risk factors. The second step was to select work tasks for evaluation. The third step was to interview those who do the work and make observations to characterize the MSD risk factors and musculoskeletal symptoms that exist for target tasks. The final step was to conduct brainstorming sessions with workers who perform the work or have a stake in the production task. The brainstorming sessions served to identify general strategies (ideas) for reducing MSD risk factor exposures. A final report of findings was presented to mine management and workforce representatives at each site. The risk factors and ideas for improvement identified for each site were specific to the target tasks examined. These target tasks were diverse, but there were some key similarities. For instance, jobs were found at each site that required a significant amount of manual work involving the upper extremities and low back. Handling heavy and awkward objects, forceful arm and shoulder exertions, and working in awkward postures were common for a variety of jobs across the four sites.

This study examined musculoskeletal injury risk at four mining sites: underground coal, underground limestone, surface copper, and surface phosphate. Each site offered opportunities to investigate musculoskeletal disorder (MSD) injury risks and how those risks might be identified and categorized. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) worked with these sites to (1) identify work activities that showed evidence of MSD injury risk, (2) examine physical risk factors that can lead to MSDs for a handful of work tasks at each site, and (3) develop a set of ideas for problem-solving to help reduce risk factors for examined work tasks. For each site, NIOSH implemented a plan that was refined over the time period of this study. The plan consisted of four steps. The first step was to use mine injury records, a musculoskeletal discomfort questionnaire, front-line supervisor interviews, and a list of management concerns to identify work groups and work activities that have significant evidence of MSD risk factors. The second step was to select work tasks for evaluation. The third step was to interview those who do the work and make observations to characterize the MSD risk factors and musculoskeletal symptoms that exist for target tasks. The final step was to conduct brainstorming sessions with workers who perform the work or have a stake in the production task. The brainstorming sessions served to identify general strategies (ideas) for reducing MSD risk factor exposures. A final report of findings was presented to mine management and workforce representatives at each site. The risk factors and ideas for improvement identified for each site were specific to the target tasks examined. These target tasks were diverse, but there were some key similarities. For instance, jobs were found at each site that required a significant amount of manual work involving the upper extremities and low back. Handling heavy and awkward objects, forceful arm and shoulder exertions, and working in awkward postures were common for a variety of jobs across the four sites.










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