USED OFFICE EQUIPMENT DENVER. USED OFFICE


USED OFFICE EQUIPMENT DENVER. MANUAL PAD PRINTING EQUIPMENT



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Perry Hutchinson




Perry Hutchinson






Company E, 13th Kansas Infantry
Page 464 to 468, History of Marshall County, Kansas, Its People, Industries and Institutions. By Emma E. Forter, With Biographical Sketches of Representative Citizens and Genealogical Records of Many Old Families. 1917, B. F. Bowen and Company, Inc., Indianapolis, Indiana.
CAPT. PERRY HUTCHINSON.
In the memorial annals of Marshall county no name occupies a higher place than that of the late Capt. Perry Hutchison, who, from the days of the very beginnings of a social order hereabout to the time of his death in 1914 was one of the leading factors in the development of this now highly favored region. An honored veteran of the Civil War, Captain Hutchinson brought to all his relations with the community interest here a steadfastness of purpose and a sturdiness of character that made him from the beginning a leader of men and of affairs and it is undoubted that he did much to give direction to the early development of this part of the state. During the fifty-five years in which Captain Hutchinson lived at Marysville he commanded the highest respect and esteem of the entire community and he was highly honored by the community, his services in this several civic offices to which he was called ever having been exerted in behalf of the common good. As state senator he gained a wide acquaintance among the leading men of the state, in which he even before that time had attained a high position, and as pioneer stockman, miller and banker he, from the beginning of things in Marshall county, occupied a position of influence that left the definite imprint of his sturdy character upon every enterprise he touched. One of the local newspapers very aptly commented in the following terms at the time of Captain Hutchinson’s death: “From the day of the redman to the comforts of civilization; from the boundless prairies, teeming with herds of wild buffaloes, to the modern farm stocked with thoroughbred cattle and horses and hogs; from the dangers of frontier life to the contentment of peaceful and prosperous homes; from the pioneer days to the present time the development of Marshall county passed like a panorama during the fifty-five years that Captain Hutchinson lived in Marysville. And inch by inch, step by step, and year by year that sturdy pioneer walked along the pathway of development, always doing his full share in the work incumbent upon those who transformed the desert into a land of peace, prosperity and happiness, until his very existence among us was woven into the warp and woof of every phase of the history of Marshall county for the past half century.”
Captain Hutchinson was a native of the Empire state, born at Fredonia, Chautauqua county, New York, December 2, 1831, a son of Calvin and Sophia (Pery) Hutchinson, both representatives of old colonial families. Calvin Hutchinson was born in Chenango county, New York, a son of Elijah Hutchinson, one of the pioneer settlers of that region and a cousin of Governor Hutchison, of Massachusetts. Sophia Perry was a daughter of Col. Sullivan Perry, a first-cousin of Commodore Perry, the hero of the battle of Lake Erie during the War of 1812, and himself a naval commander of distinction, having been in command of a war vessel that sank a British vessel off the coast of Dunkirk, New York, during that war. Captain Hutchinson was reared at Fredonia and upon reaching his majority he turned his face toward the great Northwest, which then was beginning to offer such boundless promises of development, and on his arrival in Wisconsin secured employment firm of McAdoo & Schuter, one of the leaders in the timber industry of that region in that day. That was in the spring of 1852 and he put in his time until the close of the river navigation in the following winter, in charge of the crews that drove several large rafts of logs from the Wisconsin river down the Mississippi to St. Louis. He then returned to New York, but in the following spring returned to the Northwest and bought a farm near Cedar Rapids, Iowa, where he engaged in farming. He married in 1855 and in 1857 built a combined flour- and saw-mill at Vinton, Iowa, and was engaged in operating the same for two years, at the end of which time, through the defalcation of a partner whom he trusted, he was forced to give up his entire property to satisfy creditors. Though thus stripped of material possessions, this sturdy pioneer retained a stout heart, an undaunted spirit and an eager willingness to begin over again. He bought on credit a span of horses and a wagon and with his wife and children drove through to Kansas, which then was beginning to offer inducements as a place of settlement. During the first year of his residence in this state. Perry Hutchinson found employment as a farm hand while he was looking around and "getting his bearings" in the new land, and in the following year he entered a claim to a tract of land seven miles east of Marys-ville. erected a smal











Perry Hutchinson




Perry Hutchinson





Company E, 13th Kansas Infantry
Picture of Captain Perry Hutchinson as he looked in 1889.
Page 464 to 468, History of Marshall County, Kansas, Its People, Industries and Institutions. By Emma E. Forter, With Biographical Sketches of Representative Citizens and Genealogical Records of Many Old Families. 1917, B. F. Bowen and Company, Inc., Indianapolis, Indiana.
CAPT. PERRY HUTCHINSON.
In the memorial annals of Marshall county no name occupies a higher place than that of the late Capt. Perry Hutchison, who, from the days of the very beginnings of a social order hereabout to the time of his death in 1914 was one of the leading factors in the development of this now highly favored region. An honored veteran of the Civil War, Captain Hutchinson brought to all his relations with the community interest here a steadfastness of purpose and a sturdiness of character that made him from the beginning a leader of men and of affairs and it is undoubted that he did much to give direction to the early development of this part of the state. During the fifty-five years in which Captain Hutchinson lived at Marysville he commanded the highest respect and esteem of the entire community and he was highly honored by the community, his services in this several civic offices to which he was called ever having been exerted in behalf of the common good. As state senator he gained a wide acquaintance among the leading men of the state, in which he even before that time had attained a high position, and as pioneer stockman, miller and banker he, from the beginning of things in Marshall county, occupied a position of influence that left the definite imprint of his sturdy character upon every enterprise he touched. One of the local newspapers very aptly commented in the following terms at the time of Captain Hutchinson’s death: “From the day of the redman to the comforts of civilization; from the boundless prairies, teeming with herds of wild buffaloes, to the modern farm stocked with thoroughbred cattle and horses and hogs; from the dangers of frontier life to the contentment of peaceful and prosperous homes; from the pioneer days to the present time the development of Marshall county passed like a panorama during the fifty-five years that Captain Hutchinson lived in Marysville. And inch by inch, step by step, and year by year that sturdy pioneer walked along the pathway of development, always doing his full share in the work incumbent upon those who transformed the desert into a land of peace, prosperity and happiness, until his very existence among us was woven into the warp and woof of every phase of the history of Marshall county for the past half century.”
Captain Hutchinson was a native of the Empire state, born at Fredonia, Chautauqua county, New York, December 2, 1831, a son of Calvin and Sophia (Pery) Hutchinson, both representatives of old colonial families. Calvin Hutchinson was born in Chenango county, New York, a son of Elijah Hutchinson, one of the pioneer settlers of that region and a cousin of Governor Hutchison, of Massachusetts. Sophia Perry was a daughter of Col. Sullivan Perry, a first-cousin of Commodore Perry, the hero of the battle of Lake Erie during the War of 1812, and himself a naval commander of distinction, having been in command of a war vessel that sank a British vessel off the coast of Dunkirk, New York, during that war. Captain Hutchinson was reared at Fredonia and upon reaching his majority he turned his face toward the great Northwest, which then was beginning to offer such boundless promises of development, and on his arrival in Wisconsin secured employment firm of McAdoo & Schuter, one of the leaders in the timber industry of that region in that day. That was in the spring of 1852 and he put in his time until the close of the river navigation in the following winter, in charge of the crews that drove several large rafts of logs from the Wisconsin river down the Mississippi to St. Louis. He then returned to New York, but in the following spring returned to the Northwest and bought a farm near Cedar Rapids, Iowa, where he engaged in farming. He married in 1855 and in 1857 built a combined flour- and saw-mill at Vinton, Iowa, and was engaged in operating the same for two years, at the end of which time, through the defalcation of a partner whom he trusted, he was forced to give up his entire property to satisfy creditors. Though thus stripped of material possessions, this sturdy pioneer retained a stout heart, an undaunted spirit and an eager willingness to begin over again. He bought on credit a span of horses and a wagon and with his wife and children drove through to Kansas, which then was beginning to offer inducements as a place of settlement. During the first year of his residence in this state. Perry Hutchinson found employment as a farm hand while he was looking around and "getting his bearings" in the new land, and in the following year he entered a claim to a trac









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